Category: Guest Voices

Danika Dinsmore ~ Tropes & Tips for Middle Grade Fiction Writers

Our Guest Writer is Danika Dinsmore. Danika writes and teaches children’s literature. Her middle grade fantasy series Faerie Tales from the White Forest is published by Hydra House and is geared toward ages 9+. Visit the series website at thewhiteforest.com  Visit her blog for writing exercises and industry adventure stories at theaccidentalnovelist.com. Danika is an advocate of timed writing which she uses to spur on the readers of her blogs. This is her first Guest Writer appearance on our blog. Tropes and Tips for Middle Grade Fiction Writers © 2012 By Danika Dinsmore. All Rights Reserved. Although the term “middle grade” has become more common in the literary market, there is still a lot of confusion around this term. This probably stems from the fact that this same demographic is also called “juvenile” in many libraries and bookstores. It also sounds too much like “middle school,” which generally pertains to grades 6-8, depending upon your district. I attended a round table event where I met dozens of librarians and half of them didn’t know what middle grade fiction was, so there you go. Who came up with this term? I’m betting the publishers as a way to distinguish this audience. It’s really a marketing issue, but I’ll get more into that further on. Middle Grade Literature has loosely been defined as geared toward the 8-12 year old reader. That...

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Danika Dinsmore ~ Tropes and Tips for Middle Grade Fiction Writers

Although the term “middle grade” has become more common in the literary market, there is still a lot of confusion around this term. This probably stems from the fact that this same demographic is also called “juvenile” in many libraries and bookstores. It also sounds too much like “middle school,” which generally pertains to grades 6-8, depending upon your district.

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Joann H. Buchanan ~ Guest Writer – Steps to the Paranormal Story

Our Guest Writer is Joann H. Buchanan. Joann is the author of the paranormal series, The Children of Nox. Joann hosted the long running radio show The Eclectic Artist Cave on Sharkradionetwork.com where she interviewed writers and shared her ideas and techniques. She also authors a very informative blog for writers.

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Joann H. Buchanan ~ Guest Writer

Our Guest Writer is Joann H. Buchanan. Joann is the author of the paranormal series, The Children of Nox.  Joann hosted the long running radio show The Eclectic Artist Cave on Sharkradionetwork.com where she interviewed writers and shared her ideas and techniques. She also authors a very informative blog for writers.   Steps to the Paranormal Story Joann H. Buchanan What makes a writer? What inspires us to sit for hours in front of a computer for no other reason than to get lost in our own worlds? Is there a formula that works or some sort of magical powder that calls the writer’s muse? Is there a potion for success? Some will say write something that is worth reading. But how does a person sit down and do that? How do we know that a character we create isn’t going to be flat? What about the worlds they live in, are they believable? What is it that makes a person get lost in a sea of words that will, with any luck, entertain the next person to come along? The truth is that there isn’t a magical formula—elves from another realm don’t drop off manuscripts at our doorstep and last but not least, none of it happens overnight.  A novel, poem even a song happens one word at a time. It all begins with that first word on...

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Susan Canavarro~Guest Writer

Susan Canavarro is an artist living in Florence, Oregon. Her memoir, “Fragments: Growing Up Bohemian Poor in Dementia’s House”, is available in e-book and paperback. This is her first Guest Writer appearance on our blog. I write memoir fragments. Following a few of Robert and Jack’s writing techniques, I am working on getting rid of the passive voice, replacing weak verbs with strong, using concrete nouns, shucking armored prose, and looking for metaphor. Eliminating the passive voice requires taking ownership of my thoughts and feelings and imagery. My ah-ha moment: taking ownership is scary. Taking ownership means I must stop being the victim. Taking ownership leads me to truths about myself like: I’m afraid to express myself with certainty because I am afraid of being wrong or stupid. So I hedge all writing, all painting, all thoughts using my passive voice. The passive voice is a great tool if you want to create a character like me in your novel. But I want to be strong, so out it goes! Shucking armored prose is also about taking ownership. Don’t fill up the page with abstract nouns and weak verbs like, my favorite, I’ve been thinking, or I would have thought…and for god’s sake, stop with all those adverbs! I can’t always avoid armored prose, but I’m learning not to love it. In writing The Auto/Body Connection I explored the...

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©2010-2017 Jack Remick, Robert J. Ray. All rights Reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, including text and images, without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Short excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jack Remick and Robert J. Ray and "Bob and Jacks Writing Blog" with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.