Category: dramatic conflict

Deborah Allen Interviews Jack Remick

Deborah Allen Interviews Jack Remick: Today’s questions focus on Remick’s path to publication. One technique he uses is called ‘timed writing’. Tomorrow I’ll let him explain what timed writing is, and how it helps the writing process.

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Jack’s Q and A on writing while the rice boils

On Wednesday, December 7th, Deborah Allen blogmaster of writingwhilethericeboils  will run the first installment of a Q and A session with Jack Remick. Jack answers questions about writing practice, story structure, technique, and scene structure. Check it out at: http://writingwhilethericeboils.blogspot.com/ Share this:TweetShare on TumblrEmailLike this:Like...

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Going Cosmic with Timed Writing

Going Cosmic–The Power of Writing Practice ©2011 By Jack Remick & Robert J. Ray Writing practice, writing under the clock, frees you from the clutches of the infernal ghost in the culture machine – the editor. The editor, wrapped in rules and logic, dresses up like mom, and dad, and the third grade teacher who taught you to dot your I’s and cross your T’s, and begin every sentence with a capital letter. The editor, logic posing as a rocket scientist  puts astronauts on the moon, builds atomic bombs, creates architectural marvels out of steel and concrete and glass – but the editor cannot open the doorway to the creative unconscious. Helpless in the clutches of the ghost in the culture machine, the language dies a cold, cold death. The dead language is all around us. It is around us in Pentagon obfu-speak, it is around us in oprahesque-tele-babble, it is around us in politico-pseudo-psycho chatter, it is around us in the punchless wonders of thickly paragraphed novels marching over the edge of the world like literary lemmings – weak verb, soft noun, zero conflict, washed out, pale skinned three-legged lemmings. With writing practice, writing under the clock, you shoulder the dead language aside to discover the energy of your creative powers. The dead language: “He slipped out of the room to look for the clock, and by his...

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Who Needs It?

Who needs another writing blog? An example: Writer  1: I’ve got it all written down… in my head….: After a thousand sleepless nights spent plotting and replotting novels, after talking for a thousand hours about writing, after friends have said ‘what a neat idea, you should write a novel’, Writer 1 enrolls in a writing class. “What are you working on?” we ask. “I have six novels.” “How many pages?” “Uh… I haven’t actually written anything yet. I have them outlined in my head.” “Who’s your Antagonist?” “Antagonist?” “You know? The bad guy?” “Antagonist? Uh…Well…There aren’t any bad guys in my book. I want to write nice novels…” “Okay. Nice.” “A question? “Shoot.” “How do I get an agent?” This writer needs B&J’s Blog. How do we get this writer on track? Develop the Antagonist first, we say. If you’re writing a detective novel, your sleuth doesn’t have anything to do until the killer kills or the kidnapper snatches the woman. If you’re writing a genre novel make a list of characters and fill in their lives with backstory. Spend some time on the page writing about writing. But…don’t talk about it anymore. Writers write. Go to Louisa’s. Sit down with other writers. Write the backstory on your Antagonist. Push the essential elements of the craft: Character, Action, Dialogue, Setting, Objects. Write now. Get it on the page. Now....

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Dramaticus Moebius

We built this website because we want to open a doorway for writers to go deep into the art and craft of writing. Writing today, in America, is about images. It is about images and action. We live in a post-literate world but it’s a world that lives for and consumes images, moving images—film. Art in the 21st Century is driven by the moving image. To achieve success, a writer today will create a work that transforms easily into image, a work that adapts to film, moves with ease into video. The key for the writer in this century is to know that behind every image there is a solid piece of writing. Behind every movie, there is a solid screenplay. The precursor to the image is the written word. Reading is, perhaps, on the wane, but writing is stronger than ever. To use our website, the writer does not have to write a movie or a film but she must be aware that the moving picture is the cultural pinnacle of art, a pinnacle that all other writing will reference. This means that the writer who comes here might want techniques, ideas, and insights that will lead her toward an image-based style of writing, a writing built on images and action, action and reaction. By image we mean word pictures. In the art of writing there are at...

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Copyright & Excerpts

©2010-2017 Jack Remick, Robert J. Ray. All rights Reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, including text and images, without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Short excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jack Remick and Robert J. Ray and "Bob and Jacks Writing Blog" with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.